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and provocative book, as we know where weeks away from this election. i just wanted to know, how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i cover campaigns begin in philadelphia, and so i always pay more attention to sort of passive technique just because i'm from a big city, so much attention was being paid to the vote counting and precinct targeting. so i talk to more people, and i was always shocked as a think anybody who's spent a lot of time run campaigns is that most of the people i talk you could explain to me why they did anything that they would do. like how do you know that, how do you do that? at some point they did because that some sort of rule that was really based on any research. and so i sort of when run campaigns to some degree with skepticism, the practices that were taking place and the way they were spending time, and as big as i learned about people, starting in academe who are doing the field experiments, randomized control trials, within being adopted by people in the political world, and fund more about all the innovations of data, targeting based on, basica
to the scene in phoenix in 1960's during the election when william rehnquist was interviewing with voters and brosnahan said look -- he was a very well-known and respected lawyer by thin in san francisco and brosnahan said i was there and i was the fbi agent on the scene. i positively identify him as the man. discouraging black voters. rehnquist was giving them a literacy test and which was not illegal but it was, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that was not made. >> host: kind of a case of mistaken identity so james brosnahan comes to washington and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really just kind it gets hammered because in the end he is not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it. it's just not me and that was very i thought, very typical i think of when i met with rehnquist's 10 years later. very very typical of the way that he carried a question that he did not want to a
in the 1960s during the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. and brosnahan said, look, he was a very well known and respected lawyer by then in san francisco. and buzz han said, i was there, i was the fbi agent on the -- >> host: who was discouraging black voters. >> guest: rehnquist was giving them a literacy test. >> host: right. >> guest: and, um, which was not illegal, but it was -- but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. >> guest: case of mistaken identity. >> host: so james brosnahan comes to washington, puts a lot on the line -- >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really gets hammered because in the end he's not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it, t just not me -- it's just not me. and that was very, very, i thought, cagey. it was very typical, i thought, when i met with rehnquist ten years later, um, very, very typical of the wa
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

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